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TREE STANDS

Bowhunter In TreestandOne of the most popular methods of Bowhunting practiced is Tree Stand Hunting. In some regions, particularly those with high population densities, this is the predominate method used by Bowhunters. Occasionally Tree Stand Hunting is chosen by Bowhunters due to the nature of the terrain in the area being hunted. While some species habits and behavior, for example Whitetail Deer, facilitate this method more than others.

Whatever the reason, Tree Stand Hunting is definitely one of the prevalent techniques applied by the Bowhunting Community.

This style of hunting presents several significant advantages:

Unfortunately, this style of hunting also presents several significant disadvantages: If you chose to utilize this method, one issue you should keep in mind is the Regulations pertaining to Tree Stands and Climbing Devices in the region to be hunted. These Regulations vary considerably in the United States and abroad. As with all game regulations, it is your responsibility as the hunter to be familiar with those that apply to you!

Upon adopting this method, you should familiarize yourself with the different types of stands and climbing devices available.

Before you go in the field to actively use your tree stand, there are several things you need to address. Statistically, the most common accidents occurring during bowhunting are tree stand related, particularly during ascending, setting, and descending. The following guidelines list some (not necessarily all) precautions you should take when performing these procedures in order to reduce the possibility of having any unfortunate mishaps: If you follow these rules, you should hopefully avoid a mishap while hunting from Tree Stands. Common sense goes a long way toward preventing accidents. Most so-called accidents are usually the result of folks just plain forgetting to use their heads!

Until next week, Good Luck, Happy Hunting, and God Bless.


ARROWS

BroadheadAs we all know, the golden rule--when it comes to arrows used for Bowhunting--is that they be razor sharp! Every experienced Bowhunter understands this rule to be a matter of ethics and good procedure to insure efficient harvest of game. After all, unlike firearms which bring down game predominately by shock, archery tackle in skilled hands accomplishes the same task by hemorrhage. The sharper your Broadheads are the more massive hemorrhages will be, with well placed shots. Subsequently, the more effective your tackle will be. Clean, humane harvesting of game is a big responsibility for all Bowhunters. Razor sharp Broadheads go a long way toward meeting this responsibility!

Another clear responsibility Bowhunters have is safety for themselves and others. Both handling and hunting with these razor sharp Broadheads present obvious risks which can be minimized by proper techniques. Most experienced Bowhunters, who have hunted for any significant period of time, can testify to cutting themselves while handling broadheads. These wounds can be extremely serious with devastating consequences. Especially if they occur far afield from professional medical attention.

The following guidelines list some (not necessarily all) precautions you should take when handling and hunting with arrows in order to reduce the possibility of having any unfortunate mishaps:

  1. Arrow spine should always match the poundage and draw length of your bow.
  2. Always be sure of your target and what is beyond it. Never shoot at targets on the crest of a hill, at the edge of a ledge, etc. (Washington State's only hunting fatality last year resulted from a Bowhunter doing just that.)
  3. Always use Broadhead Wrenches when handling Broadheads.
  4. Always inspect your arrows, along with the balance of your archery tackle, to insure it is not damaged prior to use. Damaged, bent, cracked arrows can fail catastrophically when shot, likely resulting in personal injury.
  5. Never climb fences or into tree stands with arrows nocked on your bow. Place bows with arrows in the quiver under fences and climb over a few feet away so you can't fall on your tackle if you do fall. Always hoist bows with arrows, and everything else for that matter, into your tree stands with a hauling line after you are safely in the stand with your safety harness on.
  6. Never carry arrows nocked on your bow until you are actively stalking game. Bowhunters have stumbled, cutting themselves or others with them.
  7. Always use a covered quiver to protect yourself and others from your Broadheads.
  8. Always store archery tackle in the trunk of your vehicle in order to prevent passengers from injuring themselves with it. In the event of a motor vehicle accident this reduces "missiles" in the vehicle as well.
  9. Always sharpen Broadheads away from your body to avoid cuts.
  10. When recovering harvested game, check your arrow first. Are all your Broadhead blades still in place? If not, use extreme caution during field dressing!
  11. Never shoot arrows straight up in the air.
If you follow these rules you should hopefully avoid a mishap with hunting arrows. Common sense goes a long way toward preventing accidents. Most so-called accidents are usually the result of folks just plain forgetting to use their heads!

Until next week, Good Luck, Happy Hunting, and God Bless All.


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