Firenock Challenge – 11



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Firenock Challenge – 11

By Keith Richter of Fayette City PA

Jun 23, 2010 – 6:15:45 AM

 



Burt Coyote Lumenok

 

    I purchased a Burt Coyote Lumenok GT color red lighted arrow nock directly from their website at www.burtcoyote.com.  The cost of the Lumenok was $10.95 plus shipping.  New for 2010 the Lumenok GT, Lumenok Signature, and the Lumen-Arrow’s Blazer nocks all use their new Elastomer battery holder system.  This system embraces the laws of physics.  It stops the destruction of nocks when the arrow hits something solid.  The Lumenok came already assembled and ready to go.  All it needed was inserted into an arrow shaft.  To turn the Lumenok off after a shot all that was required to do was wiggle the Lumenok back and forth to break the electrical current between the arrow shaft and the Lumenok.  The battery can be replaced in the Lumenok when needed.

  

 I shot my first 50 rounds with the Lumenok at a Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field point target placed at 18 yards.  I was shooting a 70-pound compound bow.  After each shot the Lumenok was turned off before shooting again.  I worked perfectly during this time lighting brightly and easy to see.

 

    After this round was complete I submerged the entire arrow, field point, and Lumenok under water for 12 hours with the Lumenok turned off.

When the time was up I removed the arrow from the water, shook it off and shot it 25 more times into the Rhinehart 18-1 broad-head and field-point target.  The Lumenok again performed perfectly lighting and turning off with each shot.

 

    After the 75th shot I mixed up a saltwater solution using 1 tablespoon of salt to a glass of warm water to be certain the salt dissolved.  I then turned the arrow upside down and placed it in the solution so the Lumenok was completely submerged.  I left it in this solution for 12 hours again with the Lumenok tuned off.

   When the time was up I removed the Lumenok from the salt-water solution and placed the entire arrow along with the Lumenok while the Lumenok was still wet and the Lumenok still in the off position into a bow case.  I shut the lid, locked it and left the Lumenok for 12 more hours.

After the twelve hours in the bow case I removed the Lumenok and proceeded to shoot it into the Rhinehart 18-1 broad-head and field point target 24 more times.  On the first attempt the Lumenok failed to light.  After wiggling the Lumenok around a little I fired it the second time and the Lumenok lit again and kept lighting for the remaining 22 times.  All I could figure was the salt water had started to take a toll on the wires that surround the Lumenok during the 12 hour soak period or the 12 hour sit in the bow case.  This would have been the 99th shot for the Lumenok.

   

    For the 100th shot I replaced the 18-1 broad head and field tip target at 18 yards with a six-inch concrete block.  The same concrete block was used for all three nock tests.  You can see the three impact points.

 

    On the 100th shot the Lumenok lit and the arrow broke in half, which was expected.  When I walked up to the arrow the Lumenok was off but still in the shaft of the arrow.  I removed the Lumenok from the shaft and the battery was no longer attached to the nock.  The battery was never found.

 

Burt Coyote Lumenok has a bright bulb, easy to see, and lit MOST of the time.  They are reasonably priced and easy to install.  When it came down to durability, even with the new Elastomer battery holder, it did not withstand impact shots.


Firenock

     I purchased directly from Firenock (www.firenock.com) the single pack Firenock S1 lighted nock in the red color for $20.95 plus shipping along with the Extreme Shock Battery End Cap (XS), which was sold in a three pack for $9.95, plus shipping.  The Extreme Battery End Cap prevents the battery from separating from the nock if an arrow should strike something solid putting the laws of physics into motion.  When they arrived in the mail there was a little bit of assembly to do but it helped me to familiarize myself with the way the Firenock itself worked.  The nock, battery, and circuit are field replaceable.  Meaning if something fails or breaks it can be fixed at home or in the field fairly quickly with the right parts.  Last, you slipped a small rubber O-ring over the battery and inserted it into the arrow is all you need to install Firenock.

 

Since I am going to use the Rhinehart 18-1 for my test, which is consider a hard target by Firenock, Extreme Battery End Cap is a recommended accessory.  It had a rubber O-ring that was placed around the Extreme Battery End Cap.  You place a small amount of glue (I used five minute epoxy) around the end of the shaft then insert the Extreme Battery End Cap with the threaded tool provided.  The O-ring around the Extreme Battery End Cap acts as a squeegee of sort and pushes the glue down the shaft to the end of the Extreme Battery End Cap.  You want to be sure to remove you field tip or broad-head when doing this so the air in the shaft is pushed out the arrows insert other wise the air might push the Extreme Battery End Cap backwards while the glue is still wet.  After the glue is dried overnight you remove the threaded tool and insert the Firenock. I.e. the usual Firenock O-ring on the battery is no longer needed as Extreme shock battery end cap is now also doing the job for center balancing for the battery.  In case of the S style you can actual damage the circuit and battery if you leave the battery O-ring on the battery as it interferes with the Extreme Shock Battery End Cap when you install it.

  I shot 50 arrows out of a 70-pound compound bow at a Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field tip target.  The distance was18 yards.  The Firenock was turned off after each shot by droping the arrow nock first on to a hard surface.  The Firenock worked perfectly for the first 50 shots.  It was bright and easy to see.

    

After the 50th shot the Firenock along with the arrow and field point was totally submerged in water for 12 hours.  The Firenock was turned off during this time.

 

      When the time was up I removed the arrow from the water, shook it off, and shot it 25 more times into the Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field point target which again was at 18 yards.  I turned the Firenock off again between each shot.  The Firenock lit every shot again and still performed perfect. 

 

    After the 75th shot with the Firenock I mixed up a saltwater solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of salt to a glass of warm water to be sure the salt dissolved.  I turned the arrow upside down and placed it in the saltwater solution Firenock end first so it was totally submerged.  It soaked in this solution for 12 hours.  The Firenock was turned off during this time. 

 

    When the 12 hours where up the Firenock along with the arrow and field point was removed from the saltwater solution and placed into a bow case while they where still wet.  The lid was shut and locked and they remained there for another 12 hours.  If you look in this picture you can actually see the dried salt-water solution on the arrow between the Firenock and the fletching.  This picture was taken after the 12-hour period in the case.

 

    The next step was to shoot the Firenock 24 more times into the Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field point target again placed at 18 yards and turning the Firenock off between shots.  The Firenock lit all 99 times.

 

 

  For the 100th Shot with the Firenock I replaced the Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field point target at 18 yards with a six-inch concrete block.  The same concrete block was used for all three nock tests.  You can see all three-impact points.

  Upon impact the arrow broke as expected and the nock was ejected from the arrow shaft.  After close inspection the nock was off the battery and the light was still glowing red. 

  

 

  I placed the nock back on the battery and inserted it into a new arrow.  Turned it upside down and dropped it the recommended distance turning the Firenock off.

   I once again shot the Firenock at the Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field point target at the same distance of 18 yards for the 101st time and the Firenock still lit.

      I decided to take this test one step further.  For my final testing I took the Firenock out of the arrow and ran it under the kitchen faucet.  I then placed it in the refrigerator freezer compartment for 12 hours.  After this time the Firenock was inserted back into the arrow and again shot at the Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field point target at 18 yards.  The Firenock lit again like it was new out of the package.  This would be the Firenocks 102nd shot after a battery of testing. 

Firenock has a bright bulb, easy to see, comes in many color options and has replaceable parts.  It cost a little more than some of the other brands but it lit every test that I put it through including the impact shot.  Without a doubt Firenock takes a beating and is my choice of lighted arrow nocks. 

 


Nockturnal

    I purchased a Nockturnal-S, red, single pack, lighted nock from DoubleTake Archery, LLC.  (DoubleTakeArchery.com).  The cost of the Nockturnal nock was $8.99 plus shipping.  The Nockturnal nock came assembled with the battery and bulb encased by the nock and it could not be removed.  The whole assembly slipped easily enough into the end of an arrow and was ready to go.  I used a 70lb.  compound bow for the testing and shot the arrows into a Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field tip target.  The distance to the target was 18 yards.  The first sequence was 50 shots turning the Nockturnal nock back off after each shot.  There is a small hole in the side of the Nockturnal nock where the tip of a hunting knife or something similar can be slipped into the Nockturnal nock and turn the light switch off.

 

          

    The Nockturnal nock performed perfectly for these 50 shots lighting every time.  The Nockturnal nock lit up brightly and was easy to see.  After the 50th shot the entire arrow with field tip and Nockturnal nock was submerged in water for 12 hours with the light turned off.

 

    The Nockturnal nock and arrow was taken out of the water after this time, shaken off, and shot 25 more times into the Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field tip target, turning the nock off after every shot.  Again it worked flawlessly.

 

  

 After the 75th shot a saltwater solution was mixed up consisting of one tablespoon of salt in one glass of warm water to make sure the salt dissolved.  The arrow was then turned upside down and placed in the glass of saltwater solution so the Nockturnal nock was submerged.  Again the light was turned off for this.  It was kept in this saltwater solution for 12 hours.

 

    When the time was up the Nockturnal nock was removed from the saltwater solution and placed in a bow case with the arrow still wet.  The lid was shut and locked and left for another 12 hours.

 

    The Nockturnal nock and arrow combination was then taken out of the bow case and shot 24 more times into the Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field tip target, turning the Nocktural nock off after each shot, and still working perfectly.  This was the nocks 99th shot.

 

   

For the 100th shot I replaced the Rhinehart 18-1 broad head and field tip target at 18 yards with a six-inch concrete block.  The same concrete block was used for all three-nock tests.  You can see in the picture all three-impact points.

 At the shot the arrow broke which was expected.  The Nockturnal nock was ejected from the shaft and landed several feet away.  Upon inspection of the Nockturnal nock you could clearly see the housing that encases the battery was twisted and the pin was protruding from the bottom of the housing.  After trying several times to light the Nockturnal nock it was clear that the laws of physics and the shock from the concrete block had left the Nockturnal nock unusable again.

 

Nockturnal lighted nock was it had a bright bulb, easy to see and lit each time.  They are reasonably priced and easy to install.  When it came down to durability, it did not withstand impact shots.

 

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