Turkey Hunting Tips from Mossy Oak Pro Staff

Darrin Campbell

Darrin Campbell

 

Q: Is there a best call to use? A: Absolutely. And I think this is one of the biggest keys to being a successful turkey hunter. The best call, and I am not trying to be funny but the answer is whatever call the turkey wants to hear. That, in my opinion, is why they make turkey vests. So there is enough room to carry all the calls. All joking aside, I can’t count the times I have tried to work a bird with my favorite mouth call and he shuts up. A lot of guys pack it in and that’s the end of the story. And that’s also where a lot of hunters miss the boat. Switch calls! Try a different mouth call, a slate, a glass, a box, anything you got in that fancy new turkey vest, and more times than not you will stir that tom into a meeting with his maker.

 

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Mike Cockerham

 

Mike Cockerham

 

Q: How much scouting should I do before the season?
A: You should be as familiar with your primary hunting area as you are with your own backyard. That way you can try to anticipate what the turkey is going to do and act accordingly.

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Kevin Faver

 

Kevin Faver

Q: Do I need to learn to use several different calls?

A: You don’t have to have numerous calls, but it certainly helps. For example, diaphragm calls can be difficult to master but when a bird is in close, it’s nice not to have to move your hands. With a little practice (this is when you drive your wife and kids crazy) you can learn to use any call.
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Tracy Groves

 

Tracy Groves

Question: What do you do to prepare for the first hunt of the season?

Answer:   Never wait until the last minute to prepare. Always practice calling because we can all improve. Go over your gear. Pattern your gun every year, do not go on last years results. Find a new turkey hunter to take to the woods. Many people use their same gloves to bow hunt deer with so when they get in their turkey vest, their gloves are not there.

 

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Mike Leslie

 

Michael Leslie

Q: Can you give me a few general tips on how I can be more successful this spring?

A: Hunting in the spring is one of my most favorite times of the year. There’s nothing like the first “gobble” in the morning as the sun is just creeping over the mountain peeks, hearing Mr. Tom talking from the tree top. The most successful tip that I can give is to scout, scout, and scout. Find the birds, and put them to sleep. Back out of there with no noise and set up 2 hours before day break within 50 yards from where you watched them roost the night before.

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Perry Peterson

 

Perry Peterson

 

Question: What do you think is the biggest mistake new turkey hunters make?

Answer: Not being patient enough. If you have done all you pre season scouting and know what they want to do, don’t get out there and bump them on the first day and then spend the rest of the time you have to hunt trying to figure out their new pattern.

 

 

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Josey White

 

Josey White

 

Q: What is a common mistake that turkey hunters make?

A: I believe the three biggest mistakes all come from one source, lack of patience. First, as I mentioned before, don’t quit hunting because you haven’t heard any turkeys early. Often turkeys don’t start gobbling until mid morning or even later. Second, many hunters who have been calling all morning to a gobbler that has been gobbling like crazy and then all of a sudden just shuts up, think the gobbler is done so just leave to early. If I am calling to a turkey that is gobbling a lot, and all of a sudden he shuts up, I am getting ready for him to show up. More times than not, within two hours he will often show up. The third mistake coincides with the second. Often hunters that are hunting a gobbler who is gobbling like crazy will keep setting up closer and closer until they end up spooking the bird and possibly making him even harder to kill. More times than not, the gobbler (or his hens) will see you long before you see him. When I encounter this situation, I will cut like crazy with a mouth call and do a jake yelp with a friction call at the same time. Then I will shut up and wait.