Good Looking Turkey Calls

Decorative Turkey Calls just knock me out. And the NWTF is the place to see some of the most innovative ones. Here are some great ones.

There is a lot to see here. Two gobblers are fighting. Underneath them two coyotes are  sneaking along. To their right a turkey hunter is waiting. And our "Wise Hen" on the handle of the box call is leaving them all behind.
There is a lot to see here. Two gobblers are fighting. Underneath them two coyotes are sneaking along. To their right a turkey hunter is waiting. And our "Wise Hen" on the handle of the box call is leaving them all behind.

It is noteworthy that one of the important requirements of all of these calls is that they be fully functional wild turkey calls. Besides their outstanding looks and creative design every one of these calls will bring in a gobbler.

A box call with a blue bird standing on the handle.
A box call with a blue bird standing on the handle.
An owl sits in the limb and a woodpecker sticks his head out of a knot hole. This is a striker call.
A skillfully carved Bard Owl sits on a bottle of wild turkey.
A female woodpecker is on the side of the birch tree and a young woodpecker is looking out through the knot hole. This is a locator call.
A handsomely carved Tom stands on a limb which is the sheith and handle of the striker for this turkey call.
Two life like gobblers strut under a tree where a hen is still on the roost. And a turkey feather is on the handle of the box call.
This is a bird that I don't recognize. It is with two chics. If anyone knows what the proper name is for this bird please post a comment so folks will know what it is.

These calls are so creative and artistic. I sincerely enjoy this exhibit.

4 Responses to "Good Looking Turkey Calls"

  1. Roy Keefer   2011/02/21 at 6:40 am

    The bird looks like a woodcock to me. They’re pretty much in the northeast.

  2. Shane Simpson   2011/02/21 at 4:00 pm

    That would be a woodcock. They use their long beak to search for worms and other insects in moist ground. Commonly found near swamps and wetlands.

  3. Shane Simpson   2011/02/21 at 4:03 pm

    Here’s a link that explains more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Woodcock

  4. Collin Cottrell   2011/02/23 at 4:56 pm

    Thanks Shane, you are the man!