Field Evaluation: Covert II Assassin Trail Camera

Article by Keith Dunlap (Field Evaluator) – Jul 31, 2009
Edited by Stanley Holtsclaw – April 26, 2017


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In this evaluation, we’ll review the features and function of the new Covert II Assassin scouting camera from DLC Covert. We’ll be testing the ease of use and performance as advertised.

– Initial Inspection –

My Covert II Assassin scouting camera arrived in good order, and the package included the scouting camera and strap, 2GB SD memory card, cables for computer or TV hookup, the wired remote control for programming the unit, and instructions for use. I’ve included a full list of features near the bottom of this evaluation, but a few key ones include:

  • Micro-sized compact scouting camera with camo for concealment
  • 24 high intensity IR LED’s with 40′ range
  • Still or video images
  • Ultra low stand-by current flow, which extends battery life
  • Accepts SD cards
  • 1.2 second trigger speed
  • 3 or 5 megapixels settings
  • Waterproof seal

Figure 1 Compact size:

After reviewing the instructions included with the camera, I installed the batteries and SD card, and I used the wired remote control to adjust some of the settings to suite my needs for evaluation purposes. I set my Covert II for still images at 5 megapixels, with high sensitivity at 1 minute intervals between photos. The Covert II could take up to 1,902 still images at the 5 megapixels setting on the 2GB SD card included with the camera, way more than enough. I found the setup and preparation for use to be one of the simplest I’ve seen with IR scouting cameras. So many scouting cameras have less than user friendly menus to follow to program features, but the remote control makes this a breeze on the Covert II. I give the Covert II thumbs up for the programming and setup features.

The Covert II scouting camera uses infrared lighting to take images and video. I like this feature as it eliminates the need for flash, which can give away the location of your scouting camera to others that might want to steal it, plus flash can spook the animals you’re after. Another nice feature of this camera is that it takes clear photos in either bright or dark lighting conditions. The Covert II has a filter lens built-in that flips down over the camera lens during the day to allow for clear color photos in brighter lighting conditions. At night, the filter lens returns to the upper position, away from the camera lens, to allow for black and white images under dark lighting conditions.

Next, we head out to the PA deer woods to strap the unit to a tree to evaluate the performance.

Easy to set up; a security safe/box is also available for the Covert II.

– Testing –

I proceeded to test the Covert II for function and performance by choosing a tree along a well-used deer trail to hang the unit for scouting. I positioned the Covert II on the tree at a 4′ height, facing north to avoid direct sunlight. I had previously programmed the settings I wanted, so I simply turned the unit on and I left it at this location for a period of two weeks to monitor the local deer herd. During the two weeks, it rained quite a bit, so I knew I would have a solid evaluation of the waterproof capabilities of this scouting camera, and various lighting conditions. I returned to the tree to find my Covert II in the same condition as I left it (always some concern for theft in my area).

During the time it was in the woods, the Covert II took 129 still images in both dark and light conditions. I checked all 8 AA batteries with a battery tester, and all 8 still had 90% power remaining, I think that is pretty efficient use of power for a scouting camera. When I downloaded the shots, I was quite impressed with the clarity of both color and black and white photos (see figures below). I also noted that the trigger speed must have been quick as advertised, because so many of the shots I downloaded included the entire body of the deer, or of the head as the deer first entered the field of view of the Covert II.

Many slower cameras get pictures of the back end of the animal as it exits the field of view, but not the Covert II. As for the waterproof seal, it worked perfectly as there was no moisture inside the unit despite days of hard rains during the two weeks it was in the woods.

Covert still shots are crystal clear, even with the sunshining brightly toward the camera. (my Springer pup “Koda”).

Covert automatically switches to IR black and whitestill shots in darkness.

Covert automatically switches to color still shots in normal lighting.

– Conclusion –

Two thumbs up! The Covert II Assassin backs up the features it boasts. It’s easy to use and takes great images.

Specifications as tested:

  • Overall size: 5.5″h x 3.5″w x 2.25″d
  • 24 high intensity IR LED’s with 40′ range
  • PIR Motion Sensor w/adjustable sensitivity
  • Wired remote control for programming
  • SD memory cards from 8mb-2gb
  • 1 sec – 60 min delay
  • 1 sec – 60 min video length
  • 1.2 second trigger speed
  • Records still or video
  • 3MP or 5MP picture size
  • Operates from -4F to 140F
  • Waterproof seal
  • Threaded insert for tripod mounting
  • Uses 8 AA batteries
  • Connection for optional 6V DC power source
  • Warranty: 1 year limited
  • Suggested Retail: $249.99
  • [CLICK HERE for the latest Covert products and pricing on Amazon]

Pros: compact size, long battery life, IR (no flash), automatic night/day settings, clear images

Cons: beeps when programming the settings, so do it prior to entering the woods

*Note: The number of pictures stored will vary depending on day, time, color or night time b/w taken. Reason being, color pictures
take up quite a bit more memory than B/W. With that being said, most trail cam pics will be after dark, therefore B/W resulting in usually 2500-3000 pics on a 2gb card in the 5mp setting.

Don’t forget to check out more posts by Keith Dunlap, or to learn more about DLC Covert and the products they offer – shop current DLC Covert products on Amazon, visit dlccovert.com online, or check our sister site, BowList.net, for more Scouting Camera related links.